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Explanation of procedures, their benefits and risks, and alternatives

Osteopathic Manipulation

Osteopathic Manipulation (also called Osteopathy, Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine, Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment) is a procedure where Dr. Yoo primarily uses his hands (and occasionally assisted by other body parts) to move, put pressure on, or shift the patient in order to relieve excess tension.

 

This may include bones and joints, soft tissue (such as muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments), organs, and the flow of fluids (such as blood, nerve, lymphatic), intraoral (inside the mouth), and more subtle aspects of the person.

 

Patients are typically clothed but are asked to remove shoes, glasses, and occasionally accessories to make things go more smoothly.

The approach, technique, and various other elements are not pre-decided. Every patient is treated as a unique individual at each visit. 

The most common risks (adverse effects) include local or generalized soreness, fatigue, change in appetite or behavior for up to 72 hours. 

It is also possible for certain techniques to cause tenderness and this will be communicated each time when appropriate.

You can always refuse a specific type of technique or approach.

Rarer risks include damaging joints, soft tissue, nerves. 

Occasionally other physical modalities may be used including cupping and these will be discussed if and when they come up. 

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a procedure where a needle is inserted through the skin into an area of the body, almost always a soft tissue area. The needle may be then manipulated and/or allowed to sit there.

 

There is very commonly a strong sensation with needle insertion and sometimes with removal. It is commonly described as being achy or sharp. This sensation occasionally persists up to a minute after insertion. 

Clothes may be moved around to allow access to certain points. 

The approach, technique, and various other elements are not pre-decided. Every patient is treated as a unique individual at each visit. 

The most common risks (adverse effects) include the sensations described above.

Infection is possible but very unlikely, especially since sterile, single-use needles are used. 

A very rare possibility is puncturing an organ or nerve. 

There can be local or generalized soreness, fatigue, change in appetite or behavior for up to 72 hours. 

Guided breathwork - meditation - movement exercises

Guided breathwork - meditation - movement exercises have a wide range of types, categories, effects, and risks.

Examples include: stretching, breathing while making different sounds, paying attention to thoughts or emotions, shaking, squatting.

Any of the physical movements will have a risk of soreness or achiness, and at worst injury to the musculoskeletal system.

Breathwork, meditation, movement exercises may agitate physical or psychological symptoms especially in those with unresolved traumatic experiences. Exercises will be prescribed to reduce this concern as much as possible. 

Consent and alternatives

Any specific procedure or instance of any procedure may be refused at any time and an alternative will be pursued.

Discussion of alternative approaches and procedures including substances (medications, homeopathic preparations, herbals, supplements, foods), procedures (injections, other manipulation, surgery) will be discussed on a case-by-case basis based on the patient's individual situation.

Parents / guardians will give consent for those that cannot give consent for themselves. 

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